Cole, Wathen, Leid, & Hall, P.C.

Defense Verdict 

Mr. Leid recently obtained a defense verdict in a weeklong jury trial in Mason County Superior Court.

Appeal of Attorney Fee Award 

Attorney fee award overturned on appeal creating new law in Washington State.

New Offices for Cole Wathen Leid Hall P.C. 

We are pleased to announce our new office location, effective November 18, 2013.

Jury Awards Less Than Medical Specials in Admitted Liability Case 

Mark S. Cole assisted by Jennifer P. Dinning represented the Defendants in a case which arose out of a motor vehicle accident in which Defendants Tharp rear-ended the Plaintiff. April 8, 2013.

Insurance Policy Time Limit Leads to Dismissal of Contractual Claims 

Mark S. Cole represented Western National in the case of Jeffries v. Western National Assurance Company, which arose out of a fire to a residence owned by Plaintiff Jeffries. April 5, 2013.

Jury Again Awards Less Than Medical Specials in an Admitted Liability Case 

Mark S. Cole, assisted by Jennifer P. Dinning, represented Defendants in Hudson v. Jensen, a case which arose out of an accident where Defendant Jensen rear-ended the Plaintiff’s pick-up truck. April 4, 2013.

Jury Trial Defense Verdict 

Rory W. Leid, III tried this case which involved a three car accident, including a FedEx vehicle and a semi-truck. April 3, 2013.

Contentious Discovery Battle With Suspected Arsonist Leads to Complete 

Ryan J. Hall represented Allstate Insurance Company in the case of Terrance I. Ross – Joyner and Dominique D. Joyner  v. Allstate et al. April 2, 2013.

Arbitrator Hands Down Rare Defense Verdict in Personal Injury Protection Suit 

Ryan J. Hall represented Allstate Insurance Company in the case of Ivan Rodriguez, Narcisa Onofre and Narcisa Onofre. April 1, 2013.

CWLH Obtains Defense Verdict in Traumatic Brain Injury Case 

Rick Wathen represented the Defendants, the Kelleys, and was assisted by Midori R. Sagara. February 4, 2013.

Can a Tenant be Sued by the Landlord's Insurer? 

Mark S. Cole and Rory W. Leid, III, were retained by American Family to represent the defendant tenants. December 4, 2012.

CWLH Obtains Judgment on Behalf of Private Lender  

Rick Wathen represented the private lender. September 7, 2012.

Court of Appeals EUO as a Condition Precedent to Filing Suit

Staples v. Allstate, Case No. 64816-1. Rory W. Leid, III, argued for Respondent Allstate and was assisted by Midori R. Sagara. May 16, 2011.

Court of Appeals Rules that Service on a Private Mailbox is Insufficient

Goettenmoeller v. Twist, Case No. 64046-1-1. Rory W. Leid, III , argued for Appellant Twist and was assisted by Midori R. Sagara. April 11, 2011.

News & Press

CWLH Obtains Defense Verdict in Traumatic Brain Injury Case

Rick Wathen recently obtained a defense verdict in Brubaker v. Kelley, Snohomish County Superior Court No. 09-2-02195-1. Mr. Wathen obtained the defense verdict after a ten-day jury trial. Judge David A. Kurtz presided over the trial.

This lawsuit arose out of a construction site accident at the Kelleys’ home. At the time of the accident, the Kelleys’ home was under construction. Mr. Brubaker fell from an unfinished second story walkway and sustained significant injuries including a subarachnoid brain hemorrhage. After six weeks, Mr. Brubaker recovered from his injuries and returned to work. Later, at another job site, Mr. Brubaker allegedly slipped and fell while climbing down a ladder and sustained further injuries. He has not worked since.

Mr. Brubaker made claims against the Kelleys, for injuries sustained in both accidents, as well as for permanent injuries/conditions, wage loss, and pain and suffering. Mr. Brubaker’s theory of the case was that in the first accident, he sustained a head injury that caused him permanent dizziness. This dizziness caused him to slip and fall while climbing down a ladder months later. At trial Mr. Brubaker requested 4.6 million dollars in damages.

The Kelleys argued that under Washington law, they, as homeowners, did not owe a duty to Mr. Brubaker that would make them personally liable. It was the subcontractors’ duties to follow safety guidelines and regulations to ensure that the job site was safe. Mr. Brubaker and his subcontractor employer both admitted this. In fact, they both also admitted that if Mr. Brubaker had completed his safety check properly, he would have identified the unfinished walkway as a safety hazard and notified his supervisor. Mr. Brubaker should not have walked across the walkway.

After a short deliberation, the jury returned with a defense verdict. As such, the jury did not consider the question of damages.